A Right Way to Worship God?

I recently read a blog post about worship styles in worship services and it launched me into deep thought. One of the observations made, which got me thinking, was this statement: “If Paul were to walk into a traditional Protestant service with the hymn singing, the reading of Scripture and the lengthy sermon he might think he was in a religious service much like the Jewish synagogue.  He may not have much trouble accepting it as a kind of Christian worship service, although he might question their understanding of the Eucharist.  However, if the Apostle Paul were to walk into a mega church with its praise bands and elaborate worship routine, he would likely think he was at some Greek play and seriously doubt he was at a Christian worship service.  If the Apostle Paul were to walk into a Pentecostal service he would probably think he had walked into a pagan mystery cult that had no resemblance at all to Christian worship”.

This is quite an indictment – and it led me to ask another question: If Paul might think these thoughts if he were to visit the church in the 21st century, I wonder what Jesus might think if he visited the churches today?

To read and interact with the full article, you can find it here:

http://preachersinstitute.com/2012/09/14/the-eternal-liturgy-vs-contemporary-worship/

Lamentations of Good Friday (stasis 1)

The Lamentations of Good Friday are both sad and hopeful. The male chanter chants from Psalm 118/119 recalling Jesus’ obedient life, while the female chanter laments Jesus’ death. The Lamentations of Good Friday were sung in all Eastern Orthodox churches the evening of April 6. To close one’s eyes and allow the words and rhythm of the chant to draw one in is to enter in part in to the sorrows Mary the mother of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, John the Apostle and the other disciples must have felt the night after Jesus had been laid in the tomb by Joseph of Arimathea.